fraud

What happens when Scientology helps you reach ‘your full potential’

(Note: This article originally appeared on Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker)

Jeffrey Augustine is back to help us think about the message in Scientology’s newest ad…

This year’s Scientology Super Bowl commercial was pretty much like the previous four: It looked like those slick Apple ads from a decade ago, and it tries to give you the warm and fuzzies about learning things about yourself.

This year’s ad concluded with these lines…

…Through all of life’s journey
There’s no language adequate to describe
The ultimate heights you can attain…
Your full potential

Those lines are heard as images of a young woman is taking the sensors for the Scientology E-meter — she’s about to unleash her full potential because she’s engaging in Scientology. That’s the point, right? And now, at Scientology’s website, you can see the same slogan…

Like its previous ads, Scientology’s commercial really doesn’t tell you anything about how Scientology works or what you’ll be asked to accept if you join. So what does it mean that Scientology will help you reach “your full potential”?

In its early history, Scientology made a lot of exorbitant claims about what it could do. L. Ron Hubbard claimed that his “technology” could cure diabetes, allergies, cancer, and other diseases, as well teach people how to “go exterior with full perception” — leave your body at will. In other words, reaching your full potential meant becoming a superhuman with amazing powers.

But is that what Scientology delivers? Seeing this new slogan made us think about some famous cases in Scientology history. Did these people reach their “full potential”?

Lisa McPherson tried to reach her full potential in Scientology. She was from Dallas and had moved to Florida to be at Scientology’s “spiritual mecca,” the Flag Land Base. Scientology leader David Miscavige himself decided in the summer of 1995 that she had gone “Clear,” a major step for a Scientologist. But then what happened over the next few months is a tragic story that this website has told in real time, on the 20th anniversary of Lisa’s death.

Steve Brackett, the one-time fiancé of The Simpsons voice actress Nancy Cartwright and a high-level “OT” Scientologist, never reached his full potential in Scientology because, facing bankruptcy and financial ruin in a church where money is everything, he jumped off the Highway 1 Bixby Bridge on the Big Sur coast of California and plunged nearly 200 feet to his death sometime in the darkness of the very early morning hours of May 28, 2009.

Sons of Anarchy actor Johnny Lewis never reached his full potential in Scientology. He murdered his landlady, killed her cat, and then fell or jumped to his death from a roof in darkness in 2012.

 

Jenny Linson, Marc Yager, and Dave Bloomberg, three high-ranking Scientology officials, are seen acting like lunatics at Los Angeles International Airport. Is this the full potential they were aiming for?

William “Rex” Fowler never reached his full potential in Scientology. Following a bitter dispute over Fowler’s large donation of company funds to Scientology, Fowler shot and killed his business partner in cold blood and then turned his 9mm Glock pistol on himself. Fowler’s suicide attempt failed, and he was prosecuted and sentenced to life in prison. As police were still investigating the crime scene, Fowler’s Scientologist wife arrived and insisted to police that she be allowed to take her husband’s briefcase as it contained classified Scientology OT materials. The police refused her demand. The briefcase was later returned.

Heber Jentzsch, President of the Church of Scientology International, never realized his full potential in Scientology because he’s been imprisoned in “The Hole” since 2004, let out only occasionally for a few appearances.

Charles Manson spent some of the 1960s at the federal penitentiary on McNeil Island in Washington State. During that time, he got into Scientology and did quite a bit of auditing — his warden at the time even said it was good to see that Charlie was applying himself to something. But Charlie didn’t reach his full potential with Scientology. When he got out of prison he put together his own amalgamation of ideas as he gathered The Family around him and committed some of the most famous murders of all time.

Reed Slatkin never reached his full potential in Scientology. Instead, he was caught swindling $593 million in a Ponzi scheme and was sent to prison. Slatkin was very generous with his stolen money and donated a great deal of it to the Church of Scientology. After his arrest and conviction, the Church of Scientology was forced to give back some of the money Slatkin had donated, although the church fought having to return the funds. Slatkin died of a heart attack in 2015, two years after being released from incarceration.

A legendary auditor and “Tech Wizard” in Scientology, Class XII Case Supervisor David Mayo was the Senior Case Supervisor International (C/S INT) for all of Scientology. Mayo had been widely credited with having saved L. Ron Hubbard from death in 1978 by using a special program of auditing that later became the basis of NED for OT’s. Mayo was regarded as Hubbard’s successor on the Tech lines of the Church. However, David Mayo fell on the wrong side of things politically in the aftermath of Snow White Program and the widespread paranoia it created inside of Scientology. Hubbard turned on Mayo and declared him an SP. Mayo infuriated Hubbard and Scientology when he defied them by opening his acclaimed Advanced Ability Center in Santa Barbara in 1983. Countless Scientologists left the Church to receive services from Mayo and his team at the AAC. David Mayo quickly became the target of Scientology’s wrath and an incredible program of Fair Game ensued. In a 2013 interview with Tony Ortega, Jon Atack said of David Mayo:

David Mayo was harassed for years. He was the subject of at least one murder attempt. I spent a month in Palo Alto in 1986, where I first interviewed Mayo and I was impressed by his sober grasp. He described without rancor the horrors of his own treatment -– for instance, being forced to run round a pole planted in the desert for hours on end –- and he was very precise. I was most impressed by his obvious distress when adulated, which happened a few times during my stays in Palo Alto. He very obviously didn’t want to assume Hubbard’s narcissistic mantle. I’m very glad that he didn’t take Scientology over, because I might have been tempted to stay in the fold. Wherever he is now, I wish him peace and fulfillment. He deserves it.


Music legend Isaac Hayes had won an Academy award, a Golden Globe, and three Grammys but he had declared bankruptcy in 1977, beset by financial and legal problems. He became a Scientologist in the early 1990s, and then enjoyed a profitable second career when he became the voice of “Chef” on a new animated cable show South Park. Chef proved to be a lucrative role for Hayes and allowed him to support his fourth wife and their young child. Following South Park’s airing of its Scientology parody “Trapped in the Closet” on November 16, 2005, Hayes was heavily pressured by Scientology to resign from the show. Hayes subsequently suffered a debilitating stroke in January 2006. Hayes’ son Isaac Hayes III said in a 2016 interview that someone in Scientology quit the South Park job on his father’s behalf in March 2006. Having lost his substantial South Park income, the post-stroke Hayes was forced to relearn the piano and return to the grueling life of touring on the road in order to earn a living. Hayes collapsed on a treadmill in his Memphis home and died at age 65 on August 10, 2008.

Declared the “World’s First Clear” on March 9, 1966 by L. Ron Hubbard, John McMaster was a celebrated and charismatic Scientology goodwill ambassador. McMaster traveled the world for many years on speaking tours, television appearance, and radio interviews where he extolled Hubbard and Scientology’s tech. A closeted gay man in a homophobic Church, McMaster was routinely punished by L. Ron Hubbard, who ordered him overboarded on the flagship Apollo numerous times. On one trip over the side of the ship, McMaster’s shoulder was seriously injured and was temporarily paralyzed. After years of faithful service while enduring abusive treatment and being paid slave wages, John McMaster left Scientology in November 1969 after being excommunicated by Hubbard. Hubbard’s hateful order read in part, “John McMaster is assigned a condition of Treason for rendering himself liable to blackmail by reason of his homosexual activities.”

Born in 1956, Annie Tidman was an original Commodore’s Messenger who served L. Ron Hubbard aboard the Apollo. Annie married Pat Broeker in 1978, and Hubbard left Hemet in 1980 to go into permanent hiding, he took his trusted aides Pat and Annie with him. Hubbard eventually settled in at his secret ranch in Creston, California in 1983. Pat and Annie lived on the ranch and took care of Hubbard in his final years. After Hubbard’s death in January 1986, Pat and Annie were thought to be potential successors because Hubbard had anointed them with the special title “Loyal Officers.” But David Miscavige pushed them out of the way to take over control of the church. Pat and Annie divorced, and Annie lived at Scientology’s secretive “Int Base” near Hemet, California as a loyal Sea Org member. She was later moved to an apartment in Hollywood to suffer the final stages of cancer. Her own family didn’t learn of her 2011 death at 55 until about six months later.

Is Shelly Miscavige reaching her full potential? It’s hard to know, because since 2005 she’s been kept at a super-secretive Scientology base in the mountains near Lake Arrowhead, California. At one time, the wife of Scientology leader David Miscavige was a major church executive in her own right, but since her banishment Shelly has been seen in public only once, at her father’s 2007 funeral in the presence of a Scientology “handler.” A new sighting of Shelly suggests that she’s still at the mountain compound, and in frail health.

Mary Sue Hubbard, the wife of L. Ron Hubbard, never reached her full potential in Scientology because she was sent to prison for her part in the Snow White Program, which she oversaw. After her release from prison, Mary Sue was pushed out of her role as a church executive by David Miscavige, and she lived in Los Feliz with Scientology handlers watching her. She died from breast cancer and COPD on November 25, 2002 at the age of 71.

L. Ron Hubbard never exhibited the potential that he promised for others that would come from Scientology. He was not clairvoyant, did not have total recall, and he was certainly not impervious to disease. On January 24, 1986, he died of a stroke while in hiding, estranged from his wife Mary Sue and their children, and with the psychiatric drug Vistaril in his blood.
— Jeffrey Augustine

Should Church of Scientology Be of interest to the Department of Homeland Security?

Should the Church of Scientology be of interest to the Department of Homeland Security?

Thanks to the hard work of researcher R.M. Seibert covered recently at the Underground Bunker, the public now knows that Scientology submitted 3,447 R1 religious worker visa petitions between 2009-2015:

As Tony Ortega noted:

— The single biggest source of applicants — 600 workers — was Russia, with Italy, Mexico, Hungary, Canada, Taiwan, Ukraine, Venezuela, Germany, and Colombia rounding out the top ten sources.

OSA’s reputation for vigilantism (Fair Game) leads us to ask if OSA wants a contingent of foreign “religious workers” for use in covert activities. Such operatives could be quickly and easily moved out of the US by OSA if needed.

Alternately, the exploitation of foreign workers by Scientology is of extreme concern. For example, Scientology confiscates passports of foreign workers in violation of US law. The DHS is interested in obtaining evidence and affidavits of any such violations.

We at the Scientology Money Project welcome an investigation into the Church of Scientology on these matters.

— INTERROGATORY —

  • Are you aware of any foreign Sea Org members in the US on R1 visas involved in OSA’s covert activities upon US soil?
  • Are you aware of any efforts by the Church to lie to the DHS about sham marriages arranged by OSA or other Scientology agents or operatives?
  • Do you know of any instances of sham marriages arranged by OSA or other Scientology agents or operatives?
  • Are you aware of any non-US Sea Org members who could not flee human rights abuses of Scientology because the Church had confiscated their passports and other documents?
  • Are you aware of any efforts by the Church to lie to the DHS about arranged marriages?
  • Are you aware of any foreign national in the Sea Org who has had a mental breakdown and was not given proper medical treatment?
  • Are you aware of any Scientology Sea Org members who have overstayed their visas and are still working for the Church of Scientology?
  • Are you aware of foreign workers being subjected to excessive working hours or inhumane working conditions? How many hours per day? How many hours per week?
  • Are you aware of specific lies told to non-US citizens in order to fraudulently induce them to come to the US and work for the Church of Scientology’s Sea Organization?
  • Are you aware of any foreign religious workers who escaped from Flag or other Scientology locations and were “recovered” against their will by the Church or its agents or operatives?
  • Are you aware of foreign workers being subjected to humiliating and/or brutal psychological or corporal punishments at Flag Land Base or other Scientology locations?
  • Are you aware of any female foreign workers being forced against their will to have abortions by the Church?
  • Are you aware of any US laws that have been broken by foreign Sea Org workers that went unreported to law enforcement?
  • Are you aware of any crimes committed in the US by foreign Sea Org workers that the Church had knowledge of and acted to cover up?
  • Do you know of any instances of child molestation, rape, or sexual abuse committed against non-US Sea Org members upon US soil that have been covered up by the Church of Scientology or its agents?
  • Are you aware of any non-US Sea Org member who has been locked up and held against their will in RPF or a “babysitting” situation?
  • Do you know of any instances of Church of Scientology agents, operatives, or lawyers offering gifts to sworn officers or civilian employees of the Clearwater Police Department or the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Department?

Please send your contact information to Jeffrey Augustine at scienowriter@gmail.com.

Your information will be kept confidential. The compiled data will be sent to various government agencies and embassies.

How Scientology changes its story to fit what it’s trying to get away with

MV2Captain_David_Miscavige

David Miscavige, captain of a legal fiction

(Note: This article first appeared on Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker and is republished here for archival reasons.)

Former Scientology spokesman Mike Rinder recently reported that church lawyer Gary Soter had sent a threat letter to former Scientology executive Dan Koon.

The church had learned that Koon helped Ron Miscavige Sr., the father of Scientology leader David Miscavige, write his memoir, which is due to come out in 2016. In his letter, Soter informed Koon that by merely helping Ron write his book, he was in violation of nondisclosure agreements and bonds he had signed as a Scientology officer. Those documents Koon had signed carried heavy penalties for violating their terms, Soter claimed.

On March 12, 1980 you agreed to pay $5,000,000 in liquidated damages for “breach of security of the CMO INT or any units working under CMO INT. This would include anything heard with regards to work…”

Sea Org members make about $40 per week — when they’re paid at all — but Scientology expects its indentured servants to pay a $5,000,000 penalty for breaking the Sea Org’s rules. What really stood out, however, was something else Soter included in his letter. Can you spot it?

On May 12, 2000 you signed a “Declaration of Religious Commitment and Membership in the Sea Organization. Paragraph 8 of that Agreement states: “I agree to maintain the confidentiality of all communications…all documents, all files, all mailing lists and all other material not commonly offered to the public for sale or use…which may come into my knowledge or possession in the course of my services as a member of the Sea Organization…”

You might remember that we’ve pointed out before how David Miscavige’s attorney, Lamont Jefferson, has said in official court documents that the Sea Org has no legal standing and has no members. Here’s what Jefferson wrote in a filing in Monique Rathbun’s lawsuit against Miscavige…

Plaintiff asserts that Mr. Miscavige exercised control because he leads the Sea Organization, a religious order within Scientology. But the ‘Sea Org’ is not a corporate entity; it has no physical or legal existence. It is not incorporated or established pursuant to legal formalities. It has no constitution, charter or bylaws, and no formal or informal ecclesiastical, corporate, or other management structure. It has no directors, officers, managing agents, or other executives; no employees, staff members, or volunteers; no income; no disbursements, no bank accounts or other assets; no liabilities; no stationery; no office, home, address, or telephone number. It does not create or maintain any financial, personnel, or other records. It can neither give nor receive orders because it has no one to either give or receive them or to carry them out. It cannot sue or be sued.

What Jefferson told a Texas court aligns with what the Church told the IRS to get its tax exempt status in 1993:

Although there is no such “organization” as the Sea Organization, the term Sea Org has a colloquial usage which implies that there is. There are general recruitment posters and literature for “The Sea Org” which implies that people will be employed by the Sea Org when in reality they will join, making the billion year commitment, at some church that is staffed by Sea Org members and become employees of that church corporation.

So, while Scientology tells courts and governments that its Sea Org has no legal reality and no members, it tells Sea Org members like Dan Koon something very different.

But then again, Scientology isn’t even consistent in what it says in the courtroom. Here’s what another Scientology attorney, Bert Deixler, said in a court briefing in Laura DeCrescenzo’s forced-abortion lawsuit against the church…

“It is exclusively from the Sea Org that the senior leadership of Scientology is drawn.”

The Sea Org has no members. But Deixler told a California court that the senior leadership of Scientology is drawn “exclusively” from the Sea Org – a group that Mr. Jefferson told a Texas court can have no directors, officers, managing agents, executives, employees, staff members, or volunteers.

So, let’s review the scorecard…

— In order to keep David Miscavige out of a deposition in a Texas lawsuit, Scientology claims that the Sea Org does not exist and has no members. Sea Org members derive authority only from their posts in the Church of Scientology hierarchy.

— In order to threaten Dan Koon, Gary Soter asserts that the Sea Org and its contracts exist, that they are legally binding; and that they can serve as the basis of a lawsuit to collect $5,000,000 in liquidated damages.

— In order to claim First Amendment protection for its abusive treatment of employees, Bert Deixler said in Laura DeCrescenzo’s lawsuit that all of Scientology’s senior executives are drawn from its monastic order the Sea Org.

Deixler was unsparing on this point in defending the Sea Org’s policies, which include outrageous treatment of children, as Laura DeCrescenzo was. Deixler cited Higgins v. Maher (1989), a case which states that anyone who enters into employment as religious clergy forfeits the protection of the civil authorities:

The courts of this State have recognized that the ministerial exception bars judicial interference with discipline or administration by churches of their clergy…”In our society, jealous as it is of separation of church and state, one who enters the clergy forfeits the protection of the civil authorities in terms of job rights.”

As I wrote in a previous column, this “ministerial exception” is why Sea Org workers do not have to be paid minimum wage or overtime; why they can be locked up and brutalized in the Rehabilitation Project Force; and why they receive no pension after decades of service. Scientology has been able to subject its workforce to endless hours, sleep deprivation, unhealthful food and psychological terrorizing, and American courts have been reluctant to do anything about it.

The Church sees Sea Org members as “coins” that can be traded among Orgs and then kicked to the curb when they weaken from age or infirmity. The Sea Org euphemism for this cruelty is called “Fitness Boarding.” Old and sick Sea Org members are fitness boarded, given $500, and then shown the door.

Is what I am describing inaccurate? Is my language too strong? Not according to the words of Bert Deixler and the Church of Scientology in their filings opposing Laura DeCrescenzo’s lawsuit:

Even if an ecclesiastical decision appears harsh, humiliating, unfair, or irrational from a secular viewpoint, civil courts have no role to play…

The Church of Scientology’s justification for its humiliating and sadistic treatment of Sea Org workers is the First Amendment. However, when Captain David Miscavige of the Sea Org is at risk of being deposed, the Sea Org does not exist.

The Church of Scientology should not be able to have it both ways: A legally nonexistent entity cannot have First Amendment protections.

The late Earle Cooley, an attorney for the Church of Scientology, once caught someone the Church was suing in a contradiction during a deposition. Cooley calmly asked, “So which story are you sticking with?”

Thus, we turn Mr. Cooley’s question to David Miscavige and the Church of Scientology: Does the Sea Org exist or does it not exist?

Which story are you sticking with, Mr. Miscavige?

Law Firm Using Television Ads to Target Scientology’s Deceptive Narconon Drug Treatment Centers

Law firms are beginning to take notice of Church of Scientology-licensed and owned Narconon:

As I have documented, The Church of Scientology had >$1.7 billion in 990-T 2012 book value. There is perhaps two billion dollars more that Scientology does not have to file 990’s on.

US Narconons reported ~$60,000,000 in 2012 revenues. My guesstimate is that Narconon globally takes in $100,000,000 per ear.

Scientology-Narconon has deep pockets, and, Narconon International’s Legal Affairs Director stated in an e-mail that there is no scientific basis for Narconon’s claim of a 70% success rate. Tony Ortega broke this bombshell story:

LEAK: Narconon’s Legal Affairs Director Admits No Scientific Basis for Advertised Success Rates

From: Claudia Arcabascio
Subject: Re: Wolverton BBB complaint and suggested response
To: XXXXXX
Cc: “PRODUCTION NNI” , “John Walser A/ED NN FC”
Date: Monday, January 12, 2009, 4:36 PM
Dear XXXXXX,

Thanks for sent me this. I don’t have a copy of the letter received from the BBB which makes difficult for me to see if the answer is appropiate.

However, I see the letter okay less than the comment of “hearsay”. It is a generality.

I cannot reach Helena today to review this. Instead, I recommend the following:

1. Correct the letter (more ARC in the letter and change the expression of “hearsay” for specifics and do not say that we have 70% success (we do not have scientific evidence of it).

2. Send a copy of the letter received from BBB to Mike Toth along with the proposed answer (corrected by you).

3. Get okay from the attorney

4. Send the letter (preferably by certified mail return receipt request). Check out this point with Mike Toth first.

If you send to Mike Toth the complete data, it should not take for him more than 10 minutes of his time.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

ML,

Claudia

To the best of my knowledge, there is no peer-reviewed hard-science study of the efficacy of Narconon. Although the Church of Scientology can easily afford to fund such a study it has chosen not to do so.

Following 911, Tom Cruise funded a special Narconon center for first-responders. This center was called the New York Rescue Workers Detoxification Project.  Both Cruise and Scientology used the center for PR and to fundraise for the Church. From the Wikipedia entry:

Tom Cruise explained his motivation for setting up the project in a Scientology promotional video that leaked onto the internet in January 2008.[10] The Environmental Protection Agency had stated after the World Trade Center attack that the air was safe to breathe. The video narration contradicted this, saying, “The devastation had spread an unprecedented combination of toxins through the air — and it was lethal.”[11] Cruise is seen dismissing the EPA’s all-clear:[10]

“Of course, as a Scientologist, you go, that’s a lie. Outright lie. Liar. Fine. Finally you say, dammit, just go there and do it. Put it there, let’s go, here’s the money, let’s go. Let’s just get one person treated. I can’t sleep another night.”

In an appearance on CNN‘s Larry King Live, Cruise said that he founded the project out of concern that 9/11 survivors would suffer leukemia, parkinsonism, multiple sclerosis or cancer as a result of toxins in their fatty tissue. He advocated Hubbard’s “research” as the only way to deal with these problems, claiming, “Doctors do not know how to diagnose chemical exposures […] You go to a doctor and now he’s going to put you on more and more drugs, steroids and things that are ineffective.”[12]

*****

Narconon is presently being sued for conspiring to misuse counseling credentials.

Narconon is also being sued for wrongful death and fraud in at least two dozen separate lawsuits.

Classed as a nonprofit Scientology “social-betterment” group, Narconon is a “licensee” of the Church of Scientology. This licensing is meaningless as Narconon is wholly controlled by the Church of Scientology. Sea Org members hold key positions and report to the Church of Scientology.

Narconon pays the Church hefty licensing fees and other fees in exchange for the use of Scientology’s copyrighted “drug treatment technology.” Some of the highest paid people in the entire Church of Scientology syndicate are Narconon salespeople and directors. Salaries for these people are typically >$100,000 per year. In 2012, one husband-wife team pulled in $500,000+ working for Narconon, this according to 990-T’s.

This “technology” uses megadoses of niacin and puts people into a sauna for many hours everyday until the “end phenomenon” is reached. The concept is that toxins are stored in fat and that megadoses of niacin and long hours in a sauna cause a person to “sweat out” toxins. Narconon variously claims this procedure is anywhere from 70-95% effective in treating drug addiction.

The “Purification Rundown” is self-referential; a person stays on the program until they feel purified. A person then “attests” to completing the Purification Rundown and writes a success story. If a person later sues the Church, such “success stories” may be used against them in court to argue that they were satisfied and had a succesful experience.

The Core of Scientology is Its Malicious System of Sham Contracts

As reported by Tony Ortega, the Church of Scientology has moved to strike the affidavit of Mike Rinder in the Garcia case.

Essentially, the Church of Scientology wants to prevent  the  Garcia’s from using Rinder’s specific knowledge that Scientology created sham legal documents designed to deter and defeat refund requests from Scientologists who request refunds.

Rinder

As we noted in our earlier blog entry, the entire purpose of Scientology contracts is to legally cripple its own members:

How Scientology Inc. Legally Cripples Its Own Members: The Four Unconscionable Contracts

Taken altogether, the contracts of adhesion employed by the Church of Scientology constitute a pattern of bad faith, fraud, and a willful and malicious intent to deceive new members at the outset.

The real core of Scientology is composed of its malicious system of sham contracts.

The intake system used by the Church is designed to strip a person of all of their civil rights from the very beginning. The Church’s fascist demand that members forfeit their Constitutional rights as a precondition of membership and participation is an indictment of the Church as a malicious entity. The series of contracts reveal an intent on the part of the Church, its agents, and even its own clergy to harm Scientologists in various ways while attempting to evade the legal consequences of the harm the Church inflicts upon people.

Scientology’s malicious and unconscionable contracts constitute bad faith and fraud on the part of the ecclesiastical hierarchy of Scientology churches. Furthermore, the “ecclesiastical hierarchy” is nothing more than a franchise system designed to cheat and defraud customers under the ruse of selling religious goods and services,

The “Church” itself does not stand behind the goods and services it sells and will, generally speaking, not issue refund as it told the IRS.  Refunds are only given if sufficient legal threat is leveled. For this reason, imo, anyone seeking a refund should instead consider suing individual churches, the Church of Scientology International, RTC, CST, and David Miscavige by name. These lawsuits should be widely publicized.

My personal emphasis in Scientology criticism long ago shifted away from space opera and celebrities and towards the legal and corporate framework — and in particular the bogus and malicious system of contracts at the heart of the Church of Scientology.

Once you strip away  “Xenu and the celebrities” what is the Church of Scientology in actuality?

The answer is simple: A dishonest and greedy franchise system that hides behind malicious contracts and 501(c)3 status. Once the 501(c)3 status is revoked, the franchise system will fall apart under legal scrutiny.

******

Enabled and assisted in its various frauds by its cretinous and despicable non-Scientology lawyers, the Church of Scientology never discloses or makes known to new members he intrinsically dishonest nature of the Church of Scientology and its system of sham contracts, bonds, waivers, interrogations, disconnection, fines, and penalties. The unalloyed malice of the Church of Scientol0gy against its own members speaks to the inherent paranoia, deceit,  aggression, and treachery of the Church.

To be as blunt as possible: You will be cheated, tricked, lied to, abused, and deceived in every way possible once you become a member of the Church of Scientology. And there is nothing you can do about it because you have signed away all of your civil rights as a precondition of joining the Church.

A Scientologist cannot sue the Church on its own terms or he or she will lose. The Church a rigged casino, a Mafia with its own rules.

Therefore, the Scientology system of contracts has to be put on trial. The system of contracts is designed to to deprive all Scientologists — Sea Org, Staff, and Publics — of their Constitutional rights.

IMO, this is the essence of the matter: The Scientology “religion” cannot be put on trial in America but its system of sham contracts can and should be put on trial.

*****

Scientology’s motion to strike Mike Rinder’s affidavit: