Scientology Money Project Master Index of Subjects and People

Aaron Smith-Levin

ABLE: Association for Better Living and Education: A Scientology Front Group

Alex Gibney

Alexander Jentzsch

Alfreddie Johnson

Allen Barton

ASI – Author Services International

Battlefield Earth


Bert Deixler – Scientology Attorney

Big Blue

 Bob Duggan – Scientology’s Big Pharma Billionaire

Celebrity Centre International

CCHR – Citizens Commission on Human Rights

Chris Shelton

Church of Scientology of California

Church of Spiritual Technology


Debbie Cook

Dan Koon

David Miscavige

Denise Brennan aka Larry Brennan

Department of Homeland Security

Disaster Capitalism


Donald Trump

Dr. Jim Beverly

Dr. Stephen Kent

Eli Lilly

Elizabeth Moss


Fair Game & Character Assassination Operations

False Membership Numbers

Flag Land Base

Freedom Magazine

Fundraising Scams

Going Clear – The HBO Documentary by Alex Gibney

Gold Base

Gary Soter – Scientology Attorney

Greg Mitchell – Scientology’s Lobbyist in Washington DC

 Hanan Islam

Hollywood Reporter


Ideal Orgs

International Association of Scientologists

Introspection Rundown

IRS 990-T Forms Submitted by Scientology Organizations

IRS & the Church of Scientology’s Tax Exemption

Jesus Christ

Jett Travolta

Joking & Degrading

John McMaster – The World’s First Clear


Joy Villa

Karen de la Carriere

Karin Pouw

Kirstie Alley

L. Ron Hubbard

Law Enforcement, the Courts, and Scientology

Lawrence Wollersheim

Leah Remini

Louis Farrakhan

Luis Garcia

Mark Fisher

Marty Rathbun aka Mark C. Rathbun

Matt Feshbach

Mike Rinder

Monique Yingling – Scientology Attorney

Nancy Cartwright


Nation of Islam, Louis Farrakhan and the Church of Scientology

Nicole Kidman

Paul Haggis


Radar Online

Ray Jeffrey


Ron Miscavige


Scientology Contracts

Scientology Corporate Structure

Scientology Genocide

Scientology Public Relations Campaigns

Scientology Racism

Scientology Real Estate

Scientology Refunds and Repayments

Scientology Social Betterment Groups


Scientology Social Media Fraud and Bad Behavior Online

Scientology Television

Scientology Media Productions

Sea Org

Snow White

Stephen Pfauth

Stolen Valor

Tom Cruise

Tom Cruise “Wife Auditioning” Story

Tony Ortega

Will Smith

World Literacy Crusade

Zac Hopkins

Scientology Television on YouTube: Statistics & Predictions

The Church of Scientology has launched its cable channel. It has done so by purchasing time on a 24/7/365 basis on channel 320 on Direct TV. However, for all intents and purposes Scientology Television appears to be depending upon being live-streamed on YouTube.

Thus, we can use existing YouTube statistics to predict Scientology Television’s potential for success on YouTube.

Our only caveat is that Scientology’s published numbers are notoriously unreliable and often completely false. For example, Scientology has variously claimed it has eight million members, twelve million members, or simply millions of members.

Absent any independent third party audit, we must take Scientology’s numbers to be both inflated and unverifiable. Moreover, Scientology’s STAND League on Twitter was caught using stock photos and claiming these were actual Scientologists. These fake “stock photo Scientologists” were exposed as such. Scientology has also been suspected of using click farms to boost ratings. With these factors in mind, we proceed with our analysis of Scientology’s performance on YouTube.

We begin with Scientology’s main YouTube channel. We learn there that this channel began on September 19, 2006 and claims 30,521,562 views as of March 14, 2018:

We note that Scientology refuses to disclose the number of subscribers to its channel. Drilling down, we use the YouTube feature that allows us to sort videos from the most popular to the least popular. Here are the ten most popular videos by rank on Scientology’s YouTube channel:

This data shows us that Scientology’s top ten videos have a total of 11,182,000 views. This is 36.6% of the total views claimed for the channel. Of note is Scientology’s 2018 Super Bowl ad with a claimed 2.9 million views. This means that one 2018 Super Bowl commercial accounts for 10% of all views since the channel opened in 2006.

What this tells us is that Scientology spent millions of dollars on a one-time Super Bowl ad in early 2018 to gain 10% of its total YouTube traffic since 2006. This does not bode well for Scientology Television as the channel is not tied to advertising on high profile televised network events such as the Super Bowl, the World Cup, the Academy Awards, or major television franchises like Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, or The Big Bang Theory.

Once we deduct the numbers for Scientology’s top ten YouTube videos, we are left with 19,339,562 views since the channel began 135 months ago in September 2006. Less the top ten videos, then, Scientology YouTube has averaged a paltry 143,256 views per month since its inception.

Scientology’s ten lowest ranking YouTube videos produced a pathetic 143,000 views; four of these videos were “The Way to Happiness” themed:

By way of contrast, the top 20 Scientology channels and videos on YouTube that are not favorable to Scientology have a total 72,850,000 views:

Name YT Channel Name Total Views in millions
Tom Cruise  – Leaked Go to Guns Video Aleteuk 12.3
Karen de la Carriere Surviving Scientology Channel 7.4
Mark Bunker Xenu TV Channel 7.1
Some crazy scientology stuff hashmanis 5.7
Message to Scientology Anonymous 5.3
Tom Cruise’s Heated Interview With Matt Lauer Today 5.3
Angry Gay Pope Angry Gay Pope Channel 5
Tory Christman ToryMagoo44! 4
Chris Shelton Critical Thinker at Large Channel 3.6
Joe Rogan Interviews Leah Remini Joe Rogan Experience 2.3
Scientology in 100 Seconds AllHailXenuFilm 2
Steven Mango Steven Mango Channel 1.78
Chelsea – Netflix Leah Remini Explains Scientology’s Scam 1.67
The Master: How Scientology Works Nerdwriter1 1.6
Aaron Smith-Levin Growing Up in Scientology Channel 1.5
Leah Remini on the Cult of Scientology Real Time with Bill Maher 1.3
Joe Rogan Interviews Ron Miscavige Joe Rogan Experience 1.3
Scientology – Louis Theroux Joe Rogan Experience 1.3
Matthew Santoro 10 Insane Facts About Scientology 1.3
Shocking Facts About Scientology TheRichest 1.1
Total Views 72.85

The conclusion here is that a highly active group of former Scientologists, critics, and media outlets can easily outpace the three billion dollar Scientology Cult on social media without multi-million dollar Super Bowl ads; 24/7/365 live streaming on YouTube; or spending $4 million dollars per year on carriage fees on Direct TV as Lloyd Grove stated in his recent Daily Beast article David Miscavige Comes Out of the Shadows on the First Night of Scientology’s TV Network. Further, we are restricting our analysis in this article to YouTube; we do not take into account books, movies, and televisions shows. Hence, Going Clear, the book and the film, Leah Remini’s Scientology and the Aftermath, CNN’s A History of Violence, the Tampa Bay Times’ The Truth Rundown, Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker and the other leading exposes of Scientology are not factored into our discussion at hand.

In terms of strategy and content, the playlists on Scientology’s YouTube channel suggest that  we can expect to see more of the same content from Scientology Television:

Based on the foregoing, my prediction is that this will be the exact content we can expect to see repeated endlessly on Scientology Television:

  1. Ideal Org grand openings
  2. Volunteer Ministers
  3. Meet a Scientologist videos
  4. A focus on Latin America
  5. Scientologists making a difference in their communities videos
  6. CCHR anti-drug and anti-psychiatry videos
  7. Pseudo-ecumenical efforts using the usual Scientology shills, e.g. Dr. J. Gordon Melton
  8. Speeches at Ideal Org grand openings by low-ranking functionaries, for example Captain John Galindo, Operations Director National Circle of Aid Technicians of Colombia

What stood out to me in my review of Scientology’s YouTube website for this article is that Scientologist skateboarder Aaron has the largest number of views for an individual Scientologist. With 809,524 views, this  young man’s ratings far and away eclipse the ratings for any video featuring Scientology leader David Miscavige. VWD Aaron!

The least popular Scientologist in the “Meet a Scientologist” series of videos appears to be Omar, an expeditionary pilot. Poor Omar has only 1,010 views since his video was released on October 28, 2010:

Bottom Line: My prediction is that Scientology Television will follow the same trajectory as an Ideal Org – which is to say that it will have a shelf life of three weeks and then it will die on the vine.

With an Ideal Org there is excitement the week before the grand opening and David Miscavige’s rope pull. Then there is excitement the two weeks after the grand opening. Thereafter, it is business as usual with the demands for stats, more money, and to get bodies into the shop. Apathy sets in and soon the glory of the grand opening gives way to the punishing and cruel grind of everyday life in Scientology.

The initial burst of interest in Scientology Television will quickly collapse once people see that it is a 24/7/365 cycling of the same content ad nauseum. L. Ron Hubbard’s pedantic lectures and Scientology hyperbole wears thin very quickly; particularly when Netflix beckons.

The Failed Logic Behind Scientology’s Curious Super Bowl Campaign

The Church of Scientology’s 2018 multi-million dollar Super Bowl ad strategy can now be seen as the grandiose and abject failure it is. Essentially, Scientology wanted to accomplish two conflicting goals that cancelled each other out:

1. Scientology wanted to use the marketing angle of “Curious?” to drive traffic to Scientology’s websites and thereby raise awareness of what Scientology is according to Scientology itself.

2. At the same time it broadcast its Super Bowl ad, the next batch of attack videos by professional Scientology troll Marty Rathbun were released. A mere coincidence? Of course not. In these pompous and unconvincing propaganda videos, Rathbun attempts to discredit Leah Remini, Mike Rinder, Tony Ortega and Leah’s Emmy-winning show Scientology and the Aftermath. If anything, these videos show how far Marty has fallen from his once high estate:

In what was supposed to be, apparently, a masterstroke of Scientology PR genius, the Super Bowl ad campaign was intended to promote Scientology. Simultaneously, Marty Rathbun’s videos were to be used as a flanking maneuver to discredit Leah, Mike, and Tony. However, this strategy failed as Scientology still has its hate websites up on Marty Rathbun. Thus, on the one hand Scientology wants to use Rathbun as a credible source to discredit Leah, Mike, and Tony while simultaneously portraying Marty Rathbun as a violent psychopath, a perjurer, and a liar on its own websites.


Scientology is using Twitter where one can see this all being played out. Schematically, Scientology illogic looks like this:
Anyone who becomes curious about Scientology and uses Google to do research will quickly discover that Scientology leader David Miscavige is a violent psychopath who has physically assaulted numerous members of his staff. Likewise, anyone who does research will discover that Scientology has hate websites on Marty Rathbun describing him in the same terms as David Miscavige. Why Scientology spent millions of dollars on its Super Bowl ad campaign and failed to address this inherent and crippling contradiction speaks to David Miscavige’s typical overreaching behavior. No one out here in the real world was fooled.


Scientology is using Twitter to argue that people are “curious” about Scientology and are flocking to Scientology’s website as a result. However, as Scientology’s own graphic below shows, Scientology is paying .64-.78 USD per click to drive traffic to its website. The graphic also shows a Scientology spend of $383,000 for organic search and $14,700 for paid search thus far. Again, no one is fooled: Scientology has just publicly admitted that it has to pay millions of dollars for a Super Bowl ad and hundreds of thousands of dollars for clicks to get anyone to look at its websites.

Scientology’s Super Bowl ad and Marty’s attack videos are a pair of bookends that are supposed to boom Scientology while destroying its critics. Are you serious Scientology? That’s all you have? A paid Super Bowl ad, paid clicks, and Marty Rathbun? Good luck betting on this Trifecta of Fail.

As stated, the big problem is that Marty Rathbun has zero credibility according to Scientology itself. The Church of Scientology still has its hate websites up on Marty. As we have asked before: Which story are you sticking with Scientology? Is Marty a credible source or he is a violent psychopath, a liar, and a perjurer as you depict him on your own website? If Marty is a liar and a perjurer, then why should the public believe anything he says?

Scientology’s Freedom Magazine currently carries this article about Marty in which he is called a lunatic with a history of psychological problems:

However, on a different Freedom Magazine webpage, Freedom links to the lunatic Rathbun’s attack videos on Leah Remini, Mike Rinder, and Tony Ortega and declares:

He’s [Marty Rathbun] recorded his knowledge of their plans, their unsavory traits, and their rank manipulation of show participants, in a 27-part video series on YouTube, “Leah Remini and Her Troublemakers.”

Having been an onscreen participant in both seasons of Leah’s show, I can tell you that the show is unrehearsed and unscripted. There is no manipulation of participants by Leah or anyone else on the set. What Marty Rathbun has said in this regard is a lie. I resent Marty lying about it, but given his disreputable behavior and the other lies he has told over the past several years I am not surprised.

Freedom Magazine repeats Rathbun’s lies about Leah’s show even as Freedom calls him a
violent psychopath, a liar, and a perjurer. Freedom even takes it one step further by linking to Rathbun’s YouTube video channel. Why would Freedom link to the videos of a man it has called a lunatic with a history of psychological problems? This question is rhetorical of course. The fact is that Freedom Magazine’s self-serving and transparent double standard is not acceptable in legitimate journalism. Freedom Magazine is nothing more than fake news, a mouthpiece for a Cult long known for its history of lying. Likewise, Rathbun’s videos are fake news. For example, Rathbun used a recent video to outrageously claim that Scientology was free from child abuse and sexual abuse. Valeska Paris tweeted about this:

From all appearances, Marty Rathbun is back to being David Miscavige’s “fixer” who is now the onscreen talent charged with attacking Scientology’s critics and former members.


David Miscavige’s multi-million dollar 2018 Super Bowl ad campaign fails because it talks out of both sides of its mouth and is underpinned by Marty Rathbun. Marty is the weak link in the chain and yet Scientology needs him to help spin its web of lies, treachery and deceit.

That David Miscavige is capable of living a life of such hypocrisy, delusion, and unreality is nothing new. Indeed, “Captain” Miscavige — a man in a fake Navy uniform festooned with fake military medals — has claimed that infinity has a front porch and that Scientologists can travel faster than light.

Scientology: Save the Planet with Monthly Installment Payments!

The Scientology Cult has long peddled the falsehood that it is the “fastest growing religion in the world.” However, the International Association of Scientologists (IAS) ad shown above is clear evidence that large single donations are drying up. Hence the IAS is now begging for Scientologists to make smaller regular monthly payments. In yet another Scientology absurdity, we are told that the planet is on the brink of extinction due to the specter of Psychiatry, nuclear weapons, British bankers, Marcabs, etc. However, rest assured that your small monthly donations to the IAS can stave off the Apocalypse.

In a further sign of Scientology desperation, we find the bloated and scammy Scientology slush fund known as the IAS has set its default monthly donation to a meager $100 USD:

Back when Scientology was on its high horse, any Scientologist offering a paltry $100 donation would have been hauled into Ethics for not sacrificing their big assets to Scientology. After all, as L. Ron Hubbard had written nothing is more important than Scientology:

“Advanced Courses [in Scientology] are the most valuable service on the planet. Life insurance, houses, cars, stocks, bonds, college savings, all are transitory and impermanent… There is nothing to compare with Advanced Courses. They are infinitely valuable and transcend time itself.” – L. Ron Hubbard, Flag Mission Order 375

The IAS asking for small monthly donations suggests that middle class Scientologists have been stripped of their “life insurance, houses, cars, stocks, bonds, college savings” in previous Scientology reg cycles. The IAS is now reduced to bargaining.

If one keeps up on religious blogs relating to church finance and tax law — and I do — an increasing number churches over the past five years have been turning to fixed monthly payment programs that draft the parishioner’s bank account, PayPal account, or charge their credit card. This arrangement allows churches to have a stable monthly cash flow while avoiding the sharp seasonal fluctuations in income due to the winter holidays and summer vacations. Thus, the IAS asking for monthly donations seems to be an attempt to stabilize cash flow by encouraging Scientologists to donate smaller monthly amounts as opposed to giving bankrupting and credit-destroying massive single donations.

Nevertheless, as the IAS is believed to have cash reserves of $1.5 billion, asking for $100 per month can be seen as David Miscavige digging under the cushions on the couches of Scientologists for loose change. The IAS is truly obscene as it sits on massive cash reserves and still squeezes Scientologists like a dishrag. The IAS does not need $100 a month from anyone. If anything, the IAS needs to become financially transparent and tell Scientologists how much money it has and how much money it gives out in the form of grants, payments for real estate, etc.

There is another data point in the form above to note. The form says “Join the thousands of Scientologists who have signed up to make automatic monthly contributions to the IAS.” Again, we were led to believe that Scientology has millions of members. However, the IAS informs us that only thousands of Scientologists are donating monthly. And notice the language: Not “hundreds of thousands” or “tens of thousands” but rather only “thousands of Scientologists.”

Other facts to be gleaned from the IAS website:

1. There are new membership fees:

2. IAS uses Scientologist as commissioned salespeople. As such, they can earn 5% or 10% commissions of what they rake in from other Scientologists. What other “religion” has commission salespeople?

3. The IAS has what it calls “Honor Balls” and sells tickets to these garish events. The keynote speaker at the IAS balls is, you guessed it, David Miscavige. COB has had a lock on this gig since the 1980’s. What we want to know if he gets 10% commission as an IAS registrar. He would be entitled to 10% as a Professional IAS Field Disemminator per the rules shown above.  We believe this is where David Miscavige has raked in his personal fortune.

4. Per the contract Scientologists must sign when donating to the IAS, all donations to the IAS are nonrefundable:

5. The IAS Honor Balls are one of the few places one can see David Miscavige in his fullblown lunatic attacks on Psychiatry and his orgies of self-love:

Podcast with Joy Villa’s Former Political Adviser Robbie Olson

GOP Political Consultant Robbie Olson and Jeffrey Augustine discuss Joy Villa’s exploratory run for the US Congress. Robbie describes the way in which Joy represented herself as a Christian and how the Church of Scientology meddled in things.

The big news is that Joy Villa apparently wanted to delay her Congressional run until 2020 when Scientology Media Productions would be broadcasting shows designed to “normalize” Scientology. Was Villa’s alleged Congressional run merely a placeholder designed to buy time and PR for her Church to launch Scientology Media Productions?

Vinnie James has a collection of tweets Joy Villa has erased in her attempts to conceal her Scientology background.

Cult Paradox: Why Scientology Is Collapsing As a Function of Its Burgeoning Real Estate Empire

The Church of Scientology is so heavily entrenched in Downtown Clearwater that it has become harmful to the community. Scientology does not pay taxes on its huge portfolio of tax-exempt properties in Clearwater and yet demands police and fire services, uses the roads, freeways, and other public infrastructure. Worse, Scientology has driven businesses, redevelopment, and tourism dollars out of Downtown Clearwater, thus further depressing the economy and tax base of Clearwater. In 2017, Scientology even announced its brazen plans for what amounted to a hostile corporate takeover of Downtown Clearwater. The details are quite alarming as can be seen in an excellent and highly detailed article by Tracy McManus of The Tampa Bay Times.

Compounding matters, John P. Capitalist recently noted that many public Scientologists are moving out of Clearwater, Florida to escape the never-ending onslaught of Scientology regges. In  Scientology “registrars” are called “regges” and are actually salespeople. All across Scientology, the regges demand donations on a daily basis. It is very bad in Clearwater and Los Angeles where the largest concentrations of Scientologists live. John P. wrote of the public Scientologists in Clearwater:

…I’ve heard from several sources that a number of longtime members have moved out [of Clearwater] in order to avoid visits from desperate “regges” in the middle of the night ringing the doorbell and demanding cash. They’re claiming to be moving for innocuous reasons like “to be closer to the grandkids,” but apparently they’re just tired of the stress and want to deal with the cult from a distance. It’s not clear how many people are making the move, but even a few sure makes it sound like the rank-and-file (all those dentists, chiropractors and small business owners) are reaching a saturation point.

It is quite true that Scientology regges do show up unannounced at any hour of the day or night at the homes and businesses of public Scientologists to demand money. I personally know dozens of former Scientologists to whom this happened. In many cases, when the public Scientologists refused to answer their front door, the rampaging regges went into backyards and beat on the patio doors in an attempt to flush their quarry from hiding. Deplorable conduct but it is nevertheless true.

As Scientology regges are usually Sea Org members, public Scientologists who treat them rudely or object to their intrusive tactics can get in very serious trouble with the Church for doing so. These salespeople are deemed to be helping “Clear the Planet” and so their unwanted intrusions are considered justified by Church management. For this reason, public Scientologists have taken to refusing to answer their doors and have stopped answering their phones as a means to avoid the greedy Scientology fundraisers. These hapless public Scientologists choose to hide as they know the regges have complete immunity to engage in predatory and intrusive tactics that include invading the privacy and sanctity of one’s own home.

John P.’s observation of the flight of public Scientologists from Clearwater led me to create this simplified graph and the accompanying commentary:

J. Swift’s Scientology Real Estate Axiom #1: The more real estate the Cult of Scientology owns in a given area, the more public Scientologists will flee the area, refuse to accept regging phone calls, attend regging briefings, or accept unannounced and intrusive home regging visits. This “Public Scientologist Money Flight” occurs as a function of an ever-increasing number of Scientology fundraising personnel occupying buildings that contain competing Orgs, Scientology front groups, and Scientology fundraising programs.

In practice, each new piece of Scientology real estate becomes a standalone business operating unit within the Scientology corporate structure. These standalone operating units are called “Orgs” or “Social Betterment Groups” and each has its own weekly fundraising quotas.  Scientology also has fundraising programs for both current and planned programs. These fundraising activities also have weekly financial quotas. All of these separate business operating units result in intense competition within Scientology for a shrinking pool of donations.


As a condition of receiving tax exemption, US tax law requires religious tax exempt organizations to spend money in the public benefit. For example, if Catholic churches  provide free services to the homeless this is seen as helping to reduce the tax burden on the US Government. Hence, tax exemption is viewed as a form of exchange. L. Ron Hubbard, however, taught that giving anyone anything for free was wrong. Hubbard said charity was “rewarding a downstat” as it rewarded people for doing nothing. Hubbard’s 1950’s view of poverty was that poor people were lazy; did not want to work; were worthless; and only wanted free welfare checks and handouts.

Hubbard’s 1950 view of poverty became Scientology doctrine. Given Scientology’s doctrinal refusal to engage in charity, the only things Scientology can actually spend its money on are real estate, self-promotion, and financing its perpetual state of warfare with those people and groups it deems enemies. This spending plan results in the Scientology we see today: A self-aggrandizing, angry, paranoid, and hostile cultic group characterized by its bloated real estate holdings and its insane and lavishly-financed wars against former members, critics, the media, and those governments that oppose Scientology and correctly see it as a for-profit business.


The endless purchasing of real estate by Scientology is paradoxically and ultimately self-destructive as it acts to exponentially increase fundraising pressures amongst competing Scientology business units while simultaneously driving membership and donations out of the Church. Scientology incessantly boasts that the growth in square footage it owns proves Scientology is growing. However, this is a misdirection. While Scientology’s real estate portfolio is indeed growing, the Cult quietly sweeps the real story of its shocking membership decline under the rug.

Scientology’s Ideal Org program was a debacle which proved that the more real estate Scientology purchases and accumulates, the fewer members it will have. The Ideal Org scam drove untold thousands of people out of Scientology due to incessant fundraising demands. Likewise, the Basics book campaign was a giant $100,000,000+ cynical money grab that saw legions of people leave Scientology.

The pointless accumulation of real estate by Scientology is a function of its tax exemption and L. Ron Hubbard’s policy that endless fundraising must occur. What Hubbard called “new money” must be brought into the Scientology each week. The smallest possible portion of this “new money” is spent paying expenses. Hubbard mandated that the remaining money be locked away in untouchable reserves. Hubbard purposely designed Scientology to generate large cash reserves. This is why Scientology’s main focus is on money. Because the IRS does not allow excessive capital accumulation by tax exempt entities, however, Scientology spends part of its reserves on the items described above.

Scientology also spends the minimum amount of money possible on its Sea Org labor force. Sea Org members live far below the US poverty level of $13,860 in annual income for an individual. Legally speaking, Sea Org members are not employees and are classed as religious volunteers. As such, they receive a meager weekly stipend of $50, usually less, plus room and board. Scientology’s goal is to spend the least possible amount of money on Sea Org members while demanding the maximum amount of production. Sea Org members routinely work 80-100 hours per week. A Sea Org work week is six and one half days in duration.  One half day is given to do laundry and clean one’s berthing area. Scientology’s slave labor program also applies to the child labor Scientology uses in the Sea Org.


As an illustration of my premise, Scientology’s Flag Land Base in Clearwater, Florida has numerous Orgs, Scientology front groups, and  fundraising programs that compete with each other daily for an ever-shrinking volume of donations. Here is what a Scientologist can be expected to donate to, or pay for, on a trip to Flag Land Base; this list is not exhaustive:

1. Flag Service Organization — Mandatory donations for auditing services and courses
2. The International Association of Scientologists — Scientology’s multibillion dollar slush fund
3. Lodgings at one of the several Scientology-owned hotels
4. Meals at one of the several Scientology-owned restaurants
5. Citizens Commission on Human Rights — The rabid anti-Psychiatry component of Scientology
6. The Way to Happiness Foundation — A Scientology Front Group
7. Youth for Human Rights — A Scientology Front Group
8. United for Human Rights — A Scientology Front Group
9. Foundation for a Drug Free World — A Scientology Front Group
10. Applied Scholastics — A Scientology Front Group
11. Criminon — A Scientology Front Group
12. Volunteer Ministers — A Scientology Front Group
13. The Basics Book Campaign — Fundraising to put L. Ron Hubbard’s books into libraries
14. The Ideal Org Campaign — Fundraising to buy more real estate called “Ideal Orgs”
15. The Archival Project — Fundraising to store L. Ron Hubbard’s works in nuclear proof vaults
16. Advanced Payments — Scientologists are asked to donate money now future services later
17. The L. Ron Hubbard Hall — a planned auditorium in Clearwater


Monastery Scientology is a term I coined in 2008 when I predicted that Scientology will be drained of its middle class parishioners and become a haven for only the wealthiest of Scientologists who can afford to stay in the game. Monastery Scientology is becoming inevitable as only the wealthiest and most status-obsessed Scientologists will remain in the Cult of Scientology.

At present, the Cult is in a Palace of Versailles phase in which wealthy Scientologists vie for David Miscavige’s attention and favor as signified by a competition for larger and gaudier IAS statuses and trophies. These statuses and trophies require wealthy Scientologists to increase ever-larger amounts of cash to Scientology.

The prime example of failure in this pointless Palace of Versailles status race was Scientologist Richie Acunto. After donating ten million dollars to Scientology, his Survival Insurance company went bankrupt. And to his ignominy — and that of Scientology —  Richie’s ten million dollar IAS trophy languished in a storage locker. When Richie failed to pay rent on the storage locker, its contents were sold at auction. Richie’s $10,000,000 trophy was sold on eBay to the highest bidder. The Church of Scientology was likely the highest bidder as the Acunto trophy has never been seen since it was sold on eBay. Again, another inconvenient matter swept under the rug. Richie Acunto has been long forgotten by Scientology.

This Palace of Versailles phase is characterized by a never-ending series of useless galas awash in flimsily contrived stories of imagined Scientology global triumphs, wildly inflated and nonsensical statistics, and garish trophies and awards. One of Scientology’s more patently absurd claims is that the mere distribution of its insipid Way to Happiness booklet reduced crime in Colombia by 50 percent.

In the terse no-nonsense language of American corporate life these events can be correctly described as circle jerks.

Scientologist Louis Farrakhan & Former President Obama

In an article entitled The Photo That Never Saw The Light of Day: Obama With Farrakhan In 2005, Talking Points Memo wrote:

A journalist announced last week that he will publish a photograph of then-Illinois Sen. Barack Obama (D) and Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan that he took in 2005 at a Congressional Black Caucus meeting, but did not make public because he believed it would have “made a difference” to Obama’s political future.

The photographer, Askia Muhammad, told the Trice Edney News Wire that he “gave the picture up at the time and basically swore secrecy.”

“But after the nomination was secured and all the way up until the inauguration; then for eight years after he was President, it was kept under cover,” Muhammad said.

Asked whether he thought the photo’s release would have affected Obama’s presidential campaign, Muhammad said, “I insist. It absolutely would have made a difference.”

I respectfully do not agree with Askia Muhammad’s assessment of the photo’s potential impact for two reasons. First, Senator and Mrs. Obama were tremendously popular with the American electorate and the media. Senator Obama was clearly in an historical trajectory that would see him become America’s first Black President. Second, the GOP and the right wing media tried to smear Senator Obama by associating him with the controversial Pastor Jeremiah Wright. This tactic failed. America was voting for a President. The election was not a referendum on Pastor Jeremiah Wright and, I believe, also would not have been become a referendum on Louis Farrakhan. The GOP’s attacks on Pastor Wright missed this distinction.

This 2005 photo also raises an additional question. Mr. Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam allied themselves with the Church of Scientology many years ago. However, there is no known photo in which Scientology leader David Miscavige and Louis Farrakhan appear together.

To the best of my knowledge, David Miscavige and Louis Farrakhan have never even made a joint public appearance together.

Why is this?

Does Mr. Farrakhan not wish to be seen with David Miscavige?

Or does Mr. Miscavige not wish to be seen with Louis Farrakhan?

Or do the two have a gentlemen’s agreement to not upstage one another by appearing together? I ask because Minister Tony Muhammad, the Western Regional Representative of the Nation of Islam, was awarded Scientology’s highest honor, the Freedom Medal, in 2017. By the logic of Scientology and commonsense itself, Louis Farrakhan should have received Scientology’s Freedom Medal for his having led the Nation of Islam into Scientology. This omission on David Miscavige’s part is most curious and suggests that a behind the scenes decision was made to award the Freedom Medal to Mr. Tony Muhammad rather than Mr. Farrakhan.

I must disclose my bias in this matter: I personally believe that Mr. Farrakhan would suffer a loss of prestige by appearing in a photograph or on a dais anywhere with David Miscavige. Alternately, David Miscavige would benefit by being seen with Mr. Farrakhan. The best David Miscavige can do, or has ever done, is to appear with minor officials, disgraced former LA Sheriff Lee Baca, or certain LAPD cops who are in Scientology’s pocket.

Mr. Farrakhan on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology in 2012:

Fast forward to 1:48 as Mr. Farrakhan explains Scientology auditing: