Marty Rathbun

Ray Jeffrey Files Petition to Depose Mark & Monique Rathbun on their Finances

July 24, 2017: As reported today by Tony Ortega, attorney Ray Jeffrey has filed a petition with the District Court of Bexar County, Texas to examine the financial records Mark & Monique Rathbun. This is a matter arising from Monique Rathbun’s sudden and unexpected firing of her legal team and dropping her legal case against David Miscavige et. al.

The poster TX Lawyer commented on the Underground Bunker today:

Just to put this in context, this is what’s known in Texas civil litigation as a Rule 202 petition, which allows a potential plaintiff to obtain a court order to take a deposition even where a lawsuit is not pending, so long as you are doing it to investigate a potential claim or suit (or to preserve the witness’s testimony for use in an anticipated suit). They’re a pretty common procedure here in Texas, and most judges routinely grant them when requested. I do note that those document requests are awfully broad, so I would not be surprised if the judge pares them back if the Rathbuns object.

Tony is right that the Bexar County courts use a rotating docket for motions hearings, so you rarely know who’s going to decide your motion before you show up for the 9 am cattle call. And the 15 days referenced in the motion is the minimum amount of notice you have to give to the prospective witness, after the petition has been served on them, before the hearing can be held. It’s unclear whether the Rathbuns have been served yet, but you would ordinarily expect service to have happened by now. So whoever’s watching the docket sheet should look out for return of service and any notice of hearing.

As a practical matter, no halfway competent attorney would ever sue a client on an unpaid contingency fee unless they had a pretty good idea that some kind of payment or exchange was made. If the Church did make any kind of payment to Marty, either as a settlement or for his recent propaganda services, it’s going to be found pretty readily.

And here’s something to keep an eye on: If and when the Rathbuns respond to the 202 petition, who is their lawyer going to be?

Related documents:

1. Document posted by Tony Ortega:

Marty1.4

2. Copy of online documents from the Bexar County Court portal:

Marty1D

Aaron Smith-Levin and Jeffrey Augustine discuss Marty Rathbun’s video series

Description: Aaron Smith-Levin and Jeffrey Augustine discuss Marty Rathbun’s video series in which he uses lies, distortions, and falsehoods to attack those who speak out against Scientology. Marty has no credibility according to the Church of Scientology itself. So why are Marty’s videos on Scientology’s website?

Example: Below is a dead agent attack on Marty Rathbun from a Scientology website. This begs the question: How can Marty Rathbun be considered a credible source by the Church of Scientology given the many hate sites it has up on Marty?

Marty.Perjurer

Is Marty Rathbun a Psychopath? Which Story is Scientology Sticking With?

Marty-Rathbun-the-shiningOn its new webpage that hosts Marty Rathbun’s videos attacking Leah Remini, the Scientology Cult is trying to keep Marty at arm’s length by spinning these videos as work Marty did on his own. Thus, the Church embraces Rathbun’s videos even as they attack him in the hate pages it still has up on Marty. This is typical Scientology schizophrenia and overreach.

Left: Image from a Scientology attack page on Marty Rathbun.

Scientology cannot have it both ways. Scientology cannot have current hate pages up on Marty Rathbun attacking him as a violent psychopath, a perjurer, and a man who engaged in obstruction of justice while citing him as a credible source to attack Leah Remini, Alex Gibney, Lawrence Wright, Paul Haggis, and so many other brave and good people who have worked to expose the brutal and evil machinations of the Church of Scientology.

Which story are you sticking with Scientology? Is Marty a credible source or he is a violent psychopath, a liar, and a “cult militia leader” as you are presently representing him to be on your own website? If Marty Rathbun is a violent psychopath, if he is a “conjurer of lies” as Scientology itself has written, then why is the Church of Scientology spending 501(c)3 tax exempt dollars to promote Rathbun’s dishonest psychopathic conjuration of lies that attack Leah Remini and her A&E show?

Marty,Hate.Page

More breathless prose about Marty Rathbun from Scientology:

Marty Rathbun’s descent into the abyss of insanity was by no means a sudden, over-the-edge plunge. Rather, his was a slow and inexorable slide into the depths of irreversible irrationality.

For years Rathbun managed to keep the madness hidden. Even when the verbal tirades metastasized into violence, the outward signs were subtle. For by then his cleverness had grown all but demonic and what he unleashed was kept isolated and behind closed doors.

But by winter of 2004, the year of his desertion from the Church, he could no longer keep his malady veiled. The cunning was gone, the rage unchecked, and so it was that a whole host of co-workers finally bore witness to what Rathbun had become. That was the evening when all of them shockingly saw, and then promptly stopped, his attempt to kill Mike Rinder with his bare hands.

According to the Cult of Scientology, Marty Rathbun long ago descended into the “abyss of insanity” and yet, suddenly, this violent and insane person is now a credible source on Leah Remini? Sorry, but Marty is simply not a reliable source. The Church of Scientology notes that Marty “blew” or escaped twice in his 27 year career. Marty was recovered by the Church after he had escaped in 1993. Rathbun’s record shows him to be a “flip-flopper” who  left the Church and returned. The Book of James, verse 1:8, counsels us as follows:

A double minded man is unstable in all his ways

And so it is of Marty Rathbun. Marty blew the Church for the second time in 2004 and began speaking out against Scientology and its abuses in 2008. Marty participated in high profile exposes of Scientology on television and in film. Marty stopped speaking out in late 2014. His wife shortly thereafter, without explanation, fired her legal team and dropped her lawsuit against Scientology and David Miscavige. Shades of Vickie Aznaran here. Now Rathbun is attacking Leah Remini, Mike Rinder, Amy Scobee, and so many other people who were his friends and helped him. But what can you expect? A double minded man is unstable in all his ways.

Even as the Church of Scientology wants to use Rathbun as a credible source, there are dozens of Scientology pages on Marty that characterize him as a monster.  In this next Scientology attack on Rathbun we read that “Rathbun’s eyes glow with a psychotic gleam.”

Long before his stunning fall from grace and expulsion from the Church of Scientology, Marty Rathbun was a practitioner of violence.

It was violence he perpetrated furtively, in secret.

It was the violence of a coward.

And, as cowards do, Rathbun – when confronted by his violence – would tearfully confess.

Punching his victims, throwing them over tables, shaking them, slamming them into walls and filing cabinets and, then, gleefully bragging about his brutish, thuggish behavior, it all spilled out in Marty Rathbun’s own words.

Later, after he walked away from the Church for the third and last time, it became apparent that Rathbun would never see the folly of his own aberrant ways.

It was impossible – for that self-absorbed aggression so embraced by Rathbun had morphed into the destructive actions of a violent psychopath.

And, no matter how he disguised it, whether as the “good old boy” of South Texas, the self-proclaimed counseling Guru of the Gulf, or, even as a militia leader, Rathbun’s actions would soon conform to a highly-flammable mix of erratic, sudden, and, dangerous violence.

Modeled after religious cult militias which make their headquarters across the rural
Midwest and desert Southwest, Rathbun makes his base in Texas.

And, like the cult militia whose members the FBI arrested in Michigan in 2010, Rathbun fancies himself “born again” in his messianic zeal and rage against his former, established religion.

A look at one close-up photo is all anyone needs to discover that Rathbun’s eyes glow
with a psychotic gleam – one that is a perversion of anything considered religious.

And from his Texas base, Rathbun dispatches his programmed militia members throughout the country to commit acts of violence – the same drug-fueled violence that he, sources say, advocates in his so-called counseling sessions.

Indeed, even when that was his modus operandi when still in the Church as an external affairs officer. Rathbun would go out of his way to start a war, pick a fight, or find the next enemy.

No matter whether those enemies were imaginary, seen only by him.

Now bitter, in exile, he seeks revenge from those who gave him every chance to repent and reform.

Those who offered him comfort – and solace – over and over again.

Barely contained with pent-up resentment, sometimes he’s pushing, shoving and spitting – as his face lights up with incandescent rage.

Other times, his features contorted, Rathbun is slamming a car door on an investigative reporter, knocking him down with a packed suitcase, and, gouging welts on the face of a documentary filmmaker.

And – on other occasions – he’s drunk and trying to storm his way past a Bourbon Street bouncer, or, being cited for trespassing after butting into a security guard.

To the practiced eye, to those who know Marty Rathbun, there is a pattern to his psychotic behavior. Just as there is a pattern to other religious militia cults whose members endorse violence while proclaiming themselves “soldiers” in pursuit of some unseen enemy.

“Rathbun is a classic bully and a coward,” says a source who knows him well. “He has a repeated history of being violent and he always blames it on the people he victimizes.”

The source explained how the rage boils up – and over – in Rathbun:

“You can see him slowly burn as he puffs up his chest and his eyes start to roll back in his head,” the source said. “When those eyes start to go, that’s when Rathbun goes physical.”

If Marty Rathbun is as insane and violent as the Church of Scientology says he is — and Scientology has a 27 year track record with this guy — then Rathbun cannot be believed about anything he says.

The Church of Scientology itself declares that Marty Rathbun is a conjurer of lies:

Marty.Hate.Page.2

In a true Scientology footbullet for the ages, the Church Scientology itself has given us ample reasons not to believe anything this “conjurer of lies” and “violent psychopath” Marty Rathbun says in his recent video series.

On a final note, Scientology tells us that Rathbun is a liar and a master of disaster:

The beginning of Marty Rathbun’s journey to nowhere began on that fateful day in 2004 when his pent-up resentments and rage finally boiled over.

Rathbun leapt on a motorcycle and roared off into the California darkness, deserting
his position and his friends and colleagues at the Church of Scientology.

Contrary to later claims that he would make to media outlets eager to spread his lies, Rathbun never held an ecclesiastical management position in the Church. He was an external affairs staffer—one who repeatedly faced justice within the Church for malfeasance, incompetence, and, indeed, what became a pattern of irrational behavior.

He said so himself when he wrote: “I have proven a proclivity for creating some of the greatest catastrophes in Church history when allowed to have some leash. If told to go iron out some line at some org, [organization] I would be hesitant and unconfident (sic). You invested in me and I haven’t been paying back on the investment. The more I try the more harm I…do. The biggest source of cross-orders and chaos and counter policy is from me.”

Rathbun’s ineptitude and gross dereliction of duty caused untold damage to the Church. His work on external legal lines created and exacerbated disasters that wasted untold sums. In his own words he said:

“Each and every time on major situations, COB [Chairman of the Board, Religious Technology Center] has had to intervene to clean up wars I had exacerbated. For example, left to my own devices in handling IRS litigation, the end result would undoubtedly have been no exemption, a billion-dollar tax bill, and possible shutting down of the Church. I have developed a slick false PR technique of positioning myself as having been integral in handling threats during and after the fact, when they are actually terminatedly handled by COB. By calculation I have lost the Church 43 million dollars on losses and expenses that could have been avoided.”

On a personal level, Rathbun mentally and physically abused fellow staffers, callously fostering what he himself described as an “atmosphere of hate.”

So when he jumped on that motorcycle, yes, Marty Rathbun had plenty of reasons to leave the Church.

Conclusion: Given what the Church of Scientology itself has written about Marty Rathbun being a liar, a perjurer, an incompetent, and a psychopath, anything Rathbun says about Leah Remini or anyone else must be rejected out of hand.

Marty Rathbun is utterly impeachable based upon the Church of Scientology’s own extensive written documentation and testimony.

What happens when Scientology helps you reach ‘your full potential’

(Note: This article originally appeared on Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker)

Jeffrey Augustine is back to help us think about the message in Scientology’s newest ad…

This year’s Scientology Super Bowl commercial was pretty much like the previous four: It looked like those slick Apple ads from a decade ago, and it tries to give you the warm and fuzzies about learning things about yourself.

This year’s ad concluded with these lines…

…Through all of life’s journey
There’s no language adequate to describe
The ultimate heights you can attain…
Your full potential

Those lines are heard as images of a young woman is taking the sensors for the Scientology E-meter — she’s about to unleash her full potential because she’s engaging in Scientology. That’s the point, right? And now, at Scientology’s website, you can see the same slogan…

Like its previous ads, Scientology’s commercial really doesn’t tell you anything about how Scientology works or what you’ll be asked to accept if you join. So what does it mean that Scientology will help you reach “your full potential”?

In its early history, Scientology made a lot of exorbitant claims about what it could do. L. Ron Hubbard claimed that his “technology” could cure diabetes, allergies, cancer, and other diseases, as well teach people how to “go exterior with full perception” — leave your body at will. In other words, reaching your full potential meant becoming a superhuman with amazing powers.

But is that what Scientology delivers? Seeing this new slogan made us think about some famous cases in Scientology history. Did these people reach their “full potential”?

Lisa McPherson tried to reach her full potential in Scientology. She was from Dallas and had moved to Florida to be at Scientology’s “spiritual mecca,” the Flag Land Base. Scientology leader David Miscavige himself decided in the summer of 1995 that she had gone “Clear,” a major step for a Scientologist. But then what happened over the next few months is a tragic story that this website has told in real time, on the 20th anniversary of Lisa’s death.

Steve Brackett, the one-time fiancé of The Simpsons voice actress Nancy Cartwright and a high-level “OT” Scientologist, never reached his full potential in Scientology because, facing bankruptcy and financial ruin in a church where money is everything, he jumped off the Highway 1 Bixby Bridge on the Big Sur coast of California and plunged nearly 200 feet to his death sometime in the darkness of the very early morning hours of May 28, 2009.

Sons of Anarchy actor Johnny Lewis never reached his full potential in Scientology. He murdered his landlady, killed her cat, and then fell or jumped to his death from a roof in darkness in 2012.

 

Jenny Linson, Marc Yager, and Dave Bloomberg, three high-ranking Scientology officials, are seen acting like lunatics at Los Angeles International Airport. Is this the full potential they were aiming for?

William “Rex” Fowler never reached his full potential in Scientology. Following a bitter dispute over Fowler’s large donation of company funds to Scientology, Fowler shot and killed his business partner in cold blood and then turned his 9mm Glock pistol on himself. Fowler’s suicide attempt failed, and he was prosecuted and sentenced to life in prison. As police were still investigating the crime scene, Fowler’s Scientologist wife arrived and insisted to police that she be allowed to take her husband’s briefcase as it contained classified Scientology OT materials. The police refused her demand. The briefcase was later returned.

Heber Jentzsch, President of the Church of Scientology International, never realized his full potential in Scientology because he’s been imprisoned in “The Hole” since 2004, let out only occasionally for a few appearances.

Charles Manson spent some of the 1960s at the federal penitentiary on McNeil Island in Washington State. During that time, he got into Scientology and did quite a bit of auditing — his warden at the time even said it was good to see that Charlie was applying himself to something. But Charlie didn’t reach his full potential with Scientology. When he got out of prison he put together his own amalgamation of ideas as he gathered The Family around him and committed some of the most famous murders of all time.

Reed Slatkin never reached his full potential in Scientology. Instead, he was caught swindling $593 million in a Ponzi scheme and was sent to prison. Slatkin was very generous with his stolen money and donated a great deal of it to the Church of Scientology. After his arrest and conviction, the Church of Scientology was forced to give back some of the money Slatkin had donated, although the church fought having to return the funds. Slatkin died of a heart attack in 2015, two years after being released from incarceration.

A legendary auditor and “Tech Wizard” in Scientology, Class XII Case Supervisor David Mayo was the Senior Case Supervisor International (C/S INT) for all of Scientology. Mayo had been widely credited with having saved L. Ron Hubbard from death in 1978 by using a special program of auditing that later became the basis of NED for OT’s. Mayo was regarded as Hubbard’s successor on the Tech lines of the Church. However, David Mayo fell on the wrong side of things politically in the aftermath of Snow White Program and the widespread paranoia it created inside of Scientology. Hubbard turned on Mayo and declared him an SP. Mayo infuriated Hubbard and Scientology when he defied them by opening his acclaimed Advanced Ability Center in Santa Barbara in 1983. Countless Scientologists left the Church to receive services from Mayo and his team at the AAC. David Mayo quickly became the target of Scientology’s wrath and an incredible program of Fair Game ensued. In a 2013 interview with Tony Ortega, Jon Atack said of David Mayo:

David Mayo was harassed for years. He was the subject of at least one murder attempt. I spent a month in Palo Alto in 1986, where I first interviewed Mayo and I was impressed by his sober grasp. He described without rancor the horrors of his own treatment -– for instance, being forced to run round a pole planted in the desert for hours on end –- and he was very precise. I was most impressed by his obvious distress when adulated, which happened a few times during my stays in Palo Alto. He very obviously didn’t want to assume Hubbard’s narcissistic mantle. I’m very glad that he didn’t take Scientology over, because I might have been tempted to stay in the fold. Wherever he is now, I wish him peace and fulfillment. He deserves it.


Music legend Isaac Hayes had won an Academy award, a Golden Globe, and three Grammys but he had declared bankruptcy in 1977, beset by financial and legal problems. He became a Scientologist in the early 1990s, and then enjoyed a profitable second career when he became the voice of “Chef” on a new animated cable show South Park. Chef proved to be a lucrative role for Hayes and allowed him to support his fourth wife and their young child. Following South Park’s airing of its Scientology parody “Trapped in the Closet” on November 16, 2005, Hayes was heavily pressured by Scientology to resign from the show. Hayes subsequently suffered a debilitating stroke in January 2006. Hayes’ son Isaac Hayes III said in a 2016 interview that someone in Scientology quit the South Park job on his father’s behalf in March 2006. Having lost his substantial South Park income, the post-stroke Hayes was forced to relearn the piano and return to the grueling life of touring on the road in order to earn a living. Hayes collapsed on a treadmill in his Memphis home and died at age 65 on August 10, 2008.

Declared the “World’s First Clear” on March 9, 1966 by L. Ron Hubbard, John McMaster was a celebrated and charismatic Scientology goodwill ambassador. McMaster traveled the world for many years on speaking tours, television appearance, and radio interviews where he extolled Hubbard and Scientology’s tech. A closeted gay man in a homophobic Church, McMaster was routinely punished by L. Ron Hubbard, who ordered him overboarded on the flagship Apollo numerous times. On one trip over the side of the ship, McMaster’s shoulder was seriously injured and was temporarily paralyzed. After years of faithful service while enduring abusive treatment and being paid slave wages, John McMaster left Scientology in November 1969 after being excommunicated by Hubbard. Hubbard’s hateful order read in part, “John McMaster is assigned a condition of Treason for rendering himself liable to blackmail by reason of his homosexual activities.”

Born in 1956, Annie Tidman was an original Commodore’s Messenger who served L. Ron Hubbard aboard the Apollo. Annie married Pat Broeker in 1978, and Hubbard left Hemet in 1980 to go into permanent hiding, he took his trusted aides Pat and Annie with him. Hubbard eventually settled in at his secret ranch in Creston, California in 1983. Pat and Annie lived on the ranch and took care of Hubbard in his final years. After Hubbard’s death in January 1986, Pat and Annie were thought to be potential successors because Hubbard had anointed them with the special title “Loyal Officers.” But David Miscavige pushed them out of the way to take over control of the church. Pat and Annie divorced, and Annie lived at Scientology’s secretive “Int Base” near Hemet, California as a loyal Sea Org member. She was later moved to an apartment in Hollywood to suffer the final stages of cancer. Her own family didn’t learn of her 2011 death at 55 until about six months later.

Is Shelly Miscavige reaching her full potential? It’s hard to know, because since 2005 she’s been kept at a super-secretive Scientology base in the mountains near Lake Arrowhead, California. At one time, the wife of Scientology leader David Miscavige was a major church executive in her own right, but since her banishment Shelly has been seen in public only once, at her father’s 2007 funeral in the presence of a Scientology “handler.” A new sighting of Shelly suggests that she’s still at the mountain compound, and in frail health.

Mary Sue Hubbard, the wife of L. Ron Hubbard, never reached her full potential in Scientology because she was sent to prison for her part in the Snow White Program, which she oversaw. After her release from prison, Mary Sue was pushed out of her role as a church executive by David Miscavige, and she lived in Los Feliz with Scientology handlers watching her. She died from breast cancer and COPD on November 25, 2002 at the age of 71.

L. Ron Hubbard never exhibited the potential that he promised for others that would come from Scientology. He was not clairvoyant, did not have total recall, and he was certainly not impervious to disease. On January 24, 1986, he died of a stroke while in hiding, estranged from his wife Mary Sue and their children, and with the psychiatric drug Vistaril in his blood.
— Jeffrey Augustine

Los Angeles Times: Private investigator for Church of Scientology alleges he was paid by Church attorney to recant statement to police

(Note: The following summary was written by Tony Ortega and is reprinted from his blog)


Kim Christensen, the L.A. Times reporter who broke the story last year about Scientology leader David Miscavige hiring private investigators Dwayne and Daniel Powell to follow his own father, Ron Miscavige, after Ron escaped from Scientology in 2012, has an important update today that is on the newspaper’s front page.

The most striking thing in Christensen’s story last year was that the Powells told West Allis, Wisconsin police that they had been told by David Miscavige personally simply to stand by and let Ron die when they observed him having what they thought was a heart attack. “If he dies, he dies,” David reportedly told them.

Dwayne Powell later submitted a declaration that he had been misquoted by the police in their report of his interview, and that he did not talk to David Miscavige. The police in Wisconsin stood by their report.

Now, today, buried fairly deep in a lengthy story about Ron’s recent memoir, “Ruthless,” Christensen drops a small bomb.

Christensen obtained pay records showing that Powell was given $16,000 in five payments after his 2013 arrest and just before his submission of the declaration, even though he was no longer following Ron Miscavige.

The pay disbursements had come from notorious Scientology lawyer Kendrick Moxon. Would Moxon pay someone to say things in a declaration that the church wanted to hear?

Christensen doesn’t say it, but we’ve already proved that Moxon would do such a thing.

Back in 1999, we showed through documents that when a man named Robert Cipriano agreed to sign a false declaration accusing attorney Graham Berry of sexual improprieties in his past, Moxon arranged for Cipriano to get a job, rented him a place to live, and leased him a car.

Moxon, naturally, denied to the Times that his payments to Powell had anything to do with Powell issuing his declaration denying that he’d talked to Miscavige.

In the spring of 2015, just weeks before Powell signed the declaration, a Scientology attorney paid him at least $16,000 for “security” services in five payments, according to check stubs obtained by The Times. The checks were written on the trust account of Kendrick Moxon, a prominent Scientology attorney in Los Angeles, the records show.

Reached by phone, Powell confirmed the payments but would not comment on them.

But he did say that he had not worked for the church after giving up his Florida private investigator’s license in 2014, when he was indicted on a federal charge of possessing an illegal silencer. It was dismissed when he entered a pretrial diversion program.

Moxon told The Times in a written response that Powell performed “security and research services” for his firm last year.

“The relationship between this firm and any investigators I retain is privileged and confidential,” he wrote. “However, I can categorically state for the record that no payments were made to Mr. Powell for the testimony in his truthful declaration.”

But Powell told the Times that he was paid to write the declaration, which was written for him and which he signed in a meeting that took ten minutes.

So what have we learned? That Dwayne Powell did tell West Allis police that David Miscavige told him to stand by and watch Ron Miscavige die. (Ron actually wasn’t having a heart attack.) And that fact becoming public freaked out Scientology so much it paid Powell $16,000 to lie and claim that he’d said no such thing.

But once again, Moxon is busted by his own documents. And congratulations to the L.A. Times!


Excerpts from the Los Angeles Times story:

For more than a year, Powell told detectives, he and his son had followed Miscavige, eavesdropped on him and spied on his emails. They were paid $10,000 a week through an intermediary, he told police, explaining that David Miscavige was the “main client.”

On one outing, Powell told police, he saw Ron Miscavige clutch his chest while loading his car and thought he was having a heart attack. He called his go-between for instructions, and minutes later a man who identified himself as David Miscavige called back and told him that “if it was Ron’s time to die, to let him die and not intervene in any way,” a police report states…

…Police in that Milwaukee suburb stand by their account: “There is no confusion in the statements that were made by Dwayne and Daniel Powell,” Chief Patrick Mitchell said in an email.

Now, in the latest twist in the saga of church-sanctioned surveillance, Powell says he was paid thousands of dollars to sign the declaration after church attorneys summoned him to a meeting last year in Atlanta.

“The whole meeting took less than 10 minutes,” he said. “They said, ‘This is what this is, and this is what it’s for. Goodbye and good luck.’ ”

Scientology Insider Dan Koon – Part 2: Ron Miscavige’s book Ruthless

Dan Koon ghost wrote Ron Miscavige Sr.’s book Ruthless. In this interview Dan discusses the writing and vetting process of the book and addresses Marty Rathbun’s criticisms of the book. Dan also shares highlights of his 27 years in the Sea Org. In the forward to his self-published book What’s Wrong with Scientology? Marty Rathbun had great things to say about Dan Koon:

whatiswrongwithscientologyeditordankoon