Ron Miscavige Sr.

The Scientology Rogues’ Gallery



Scientology OTVIII William Rex Fowler was convicted of first degree murdering for shooting and killing his business partner at point blank range. Fowler was sentenced to life in prison with no parole:



A private investigator working for the Church of Scientology via cut outs is arrested for hacking the phones of Mike Rinder and Tony Ortega. Radar story:



Marty Rathbun admits to destroying key evidence in the death of Scientologist Lisa McPherson. This video is from the Tampa Bay Times seminal series The Truth Rundown. The interview is between reporter Joe Childs of the TBT and Marty Rathbun:


Tony Ortega: Police Raid Narconon in Atlanta


Scientology’s Atlanta Drug Rehab Crumbling: Executive Director Mary Rieser Out









Tennessee Scientologist charged for holding people against their will at treatment facility







Spain 1988: 71 Arrested in Scientology Probe





Scientology’s fraud conviction upheld in France


April 2015: Tony Ortega posts audio of the police interviews of the private investigators who followed Ron Miscavige Sr. while carrying an arsenal:





Los Angeles Times: Private investigator for Church of Scientology alleges he was paid by Church attorney to recant statement to police

(Note: The following summary was written by Tony Ortega and is reprinted from his blog)


Kim Christensen, the L.A. Times reporter who broke the story last year about Scientology leader David Miscavige hiring private investigators Dwayne and Daniel Powell to follow his own father, Ron Miscavige, after Ron escaped from Scientology in 2012, has an important update today that is on the newspaper’s front page.

The most striking thing in Christensen’s story last year was that the Powells told West Allis, Wisconsin police that they had been told by David Miscavige personally simply to stand by and let Ron die when they observed him having what they thought was a heart attack. “If he dies, he dies,” David reportedly told them.

Dwayne Powell later submitted a declaration that he had been misquoted by the police in their report of his interview, and that he did not talk to David Miscavige. The police in Wisconsin stood by their report.

Now, today, buried fairly deep in a lengthy story about Ron’s recent memoir, “Ruthless,” Christensen drops a small bomb.

Christensen obtained pay records showing that Powell was given $16,000 in five payments after his 2013 arrest and just before his submission of the declaration, even though he was no longer following Ron Miscavige.

The pay disbursements had come from notorious Scientology lawyer Kendrick Moxon. Would Moxon pay someone to say things in a declaration that the church wanted to hear?

Christensen doesn’t say it, but we’ve already proved that Moxon would do such a thing.

Back in 1999, we showed through documents that when a man named Robert Cipriano agreed to sign a false declaration accusing attorney Graham Berry of sexual improprieties in his past, Moxon arranged for Cipriano to get a job, rented him a place to live, and leased him a car.

Moxon, naturally, denied to the Times that his payments to Powell had anything to do with Powell issuing his declaration denying that he’d talked to Miscavige.

In the spring of 2015, just weeks before Powell signed the declaration, a Scientology attorney paid him at least $16,000 for “security” services in five payments, according to check stubs obtained by The Times. The checks were written on the trust account of Kendrick Moxon, a prominent Scientology attorney in Los Angeles, the records show.

Reached by phone, Powell confirmed the payments but would not comment on them.

But he did say that he had not worked for the church after giving up his Florida private investigator’s license in 2014, when he was indicted on a federal charge of possessing an illegal silencer. It was dismissed when he entered a pretrial diversion program.

Moxon told The Times in a written response that Powell performed “security and research services” for his firm last year.

“The relationship between this firm and any investigators I retain is privileged and confidential,” he wrote. “However, I can categorically state for the record that no payments were made to Mr. Powell for the testimony in his truthful declaration.”

But Powell told the Times that he was paid to write the declaration, which was written for him and which he signed in a meeting that took ten minutes.

So what have we learned? That Dwayne Powell did tell West Allis police that David Miscavige told him to stand by and watch Ron Miscavige die. (Ron actually wasn’t having a heart attack.) And that fact becoming public freaked out Scientology so much it paid Powell $16,000 to lie and claim that he’d said no such thing.

But once again, Moxon is busted by his own documents. And congratulations to the L.A. Times!


Excerpts from the Los Angeles Times story:

For more than a year, Powell told detectives, he and his son had followed Miscavige, eavesdropped on him and spied on his emails. They were paid $10,000 a week through an intermediary, he told police, explaining that David Miscavige was the “main client.”

On one outing, Powell told police, he saw Ron Miscavige clutch his chest while loading his car and thought he was having a heart attack. He called his go-between for instructions, and minutes later a man who identified himself as David Miscavige called back and told him that “if it was Ron’s time to die, to let him die and not intervene in any way,” a police report states…

…Police in that Milwaukee suburb stand by their account: “There is no confusion in the statements that were made by Dwayne and Daniel Powell,” Chief Patrick Mitchell said in an email.

Now, in the latest twist in the saga of church-sanctioned surveillance, Powell says he was paid thousands of dollars to sign the declaration after church attorneys summoned him to a meeting last year in Atlanta.

“The whole meeting took less than 10 minutes,” he said. “They said, ‘This is what this is, and this is what it’s for. Goodbye and good luck.’ ”

Scientology Insider Dan Koon – Part 2: Ron Miscavige’s book Ruthless

Dan Koon ghost wrote Ron Miscavige Sr.’s book Ruthless. In this interview Dan discusses the writing and vetting process of the book and addresses Marty Rathbun’s criticisms of the book. Dan also shares highlights of his 27 years in the Sea Org. In the forward to his self-published book What’s Wrong with Scientology? Marty Rathbun had great things to say about Dan Koon:

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WARNING! Possible OSA Phishing Attempt!


Scientology High Strangeness Alert!

4/28/2016 @ 7:58 PM PST

On the eve of ABC 20/20’s broadcast about Ron Miscavige Sr.’s book Ruthless, OSA, or its agents, appear to be engaged in a phishing attempt. I just received this e-mail:
UPDATE: Dozens of people have reported receiving this e-mail in the past hour.

phishing

Please tweet, instagram, FB, etc. to warn others! Do not click the link.

 

 

Ron Miscavige Sr.’s book “Ruthless” to be Released May 3rd!

MiscavigeRuthless

Another Tony Ortega exclusive: Ron Miscavige Sr., father of Scientology leader David Miscavige, is set to release his book Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscavige, and Me. Release date is May 3, 2016.

Published by St. Martin’s, Ron Sr.’s long-awaited book is sure to be a sensation. Assisted by Dan Koon, one of the best and smartest editors a writer in these circles could hope for, news of the book’s impending release went viral after Tony Ortega broke the story.

We at the Scientology Money Project salute Ron Miscavige Sr. for having the courage to write this book and look forward to reading it.

*****
Will the Church of Scientology engage in Fair Game against Ron Miscavige Sr? Of course it will. However, we take a moment to remind Scientology’s Office of Special Affairs of the Department of Justice and the US Treasury Department’s interest in the IRS’ illegality doctrine as it relates to violations of public policy by tax exempt groups.

As we related in our last post, the 1994 IRS publication Illegality and Public Policy Considerations cited the Church of Scientology when discussing the IRS’ 1983 revocation of the tax exempt status of Bob Jones University:

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Fair Game is a violation of public policy; specifically Fair Game is a conspiracy to “injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate” those who engage in free speech to speak out against the Church of Scientology. Title 18, Section 241 of US Code make this quite clear:

Title 18, U.S.C., Section 241
Conspiracy Against Rights

This statute makes it unlawful for two or more persons to conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate any person of any state, territory or district in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him/her by the Constitution or the laws of the United States, (or because of his/her having exercised the same).

Scientology policy mandates that its Office of Special Affairs spend tax exempt dollars to engage in a systematic conspiracy against the rights of persons by use of oppression, threats, and intimidation. Indeed, this is the very definition of Fair Game.

The Church of Scientology is far more at risk in terms of civil rights violations than it is at risk for inurement. Inasmuch as the IAS slush fund is legally separate from the Church, the IAS slush fund is effectively a firewall against charges of inurement. However, Fair Game is a clear civil rights violation. And to the extent that Fair Game is ordered by Miscavige and OSA and financed by IAS the corporate veils are breached. Captain Miscavige is the managing agent of the entire Scientology ball of wax.

David Miscavige has already had his father followed and stalked by heavily armed private investigators. The two PI’s were arrested with an arsenal of weapons, ammunition, and a silencer. That David Miscavige and the Church of Scientology feel the need to hire heavily armed thugs begs the question: Why is Scientology and David Miscavige so terrified?

The IRS Paper on Illegality and Public Policy Considerations:

How Scientology changes its story to fit what it’s trying to get away with

MV2Captain_David_Miscavige

David Miscavige, captain of a legal fiction

(Note: This article first appeared on Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker and is republished here for archival reasons.)

Former Scientology spokesman Mike Rinder recently reported that church lawyer Gary Soter had sent a threat letter to former Scientology executive Dan Koon.

The church had learned that Koon helped Ron Miscavige Sr., the father of Scientology leader David Miscavige, write his memoir, which is due to come out in 2016. In his letter, Soter informed Koon that by merely helping Ron write his book, he was in violation of nondisclosure agreements and bonds he had signed as a Scientology officer. Those documents Koon had signed carried heavy penalties for violating their terms, Soter claimed.

On March 12, 1980 you agreed to pay $5,000,000 in liquidated damages for “breach of security of the CMO INT or any units working under CMO INT. This would include anything heard with regards to work…”

Sea Org members make about $40 per week — when they’re paid at all — but Scientology expects its indentured servants to pay a $5,000,000 penalty for breaking the Sea Org’s rules. What really stood out, however, was something else Soter included in his letter. Can you spot it?

On May 12, 2000 you signed a “Declaration of Religious Commitment and Membership in the Sea Organization. Paragraph 8 of that Agreement states: “I agree to maintain the confidentiality of all communications…all documents, all files, all mailing lists and all other material not commonly offered to the public for sale or use…which may come into my knowledge or possession in the course of my services as a member of the Sea Organization…”

You might remember that we’ve pointed out before how David Miscavige’s attorney, Lamont Jefferson, has said in official court documents that the Sea Org has no legal standing and has no members. Here’s what Jefferson wrote in a filing in Monique Rathbun’s lawsuit against Miscavige…

Plaintiff asserts that Mr. Miscavige exercised control because he leads the Sea Organization, a religious order within Scientology. But the ‘Sea Org’ is not a corporate entity; it has no physical or legal existence. It is not incorporated or established pursuant to legal formalities. It has no constitution, charter or bylaws, and no formal or informal ecclesiastical, corporate, or other management structure. It has no directors, officers, managing agents, or other executives; no employees, staff members, or volunteers; no income; no disbursements, no bank accounts or other assets; no liabilities; no stationery; no office, home, address, or telephone number. It does not create or maintain any financial, personnel, or other records. It can neither give nor receive orders because it has no one to either give or receive them or to carry them out. It cannot sue or be sued.

What Jefferson told a Texas court aligns with what the Church told the IRS to get its tax exempt status in 1993:

Although there is no such “organization” as the Sea Organization, the term Sea Org has a colloquial usage which implies that there is. There are general recruitment posters and literature for “The Sea Org” which implies that people will be employed by the Sea Org when in reality they will join, making the billion year commitment, at some church that is staffed by Sea Org members and become employees of that church corporation.

So, while Scientology tells courts and governments that its Sea Org has no legal reality and no members, it tells Sea Org members like Dan Koon something very different.

But then again, Scientology isn’t even consistent in what it says in the courtroom. Here’s what another Scientology attorney, Bert Deixler, said in a court briefing in Laura DeCrescenzo’s forced-abortion lawsuit against the church…

“It is exclusively from the Sea Org that the senior leadership of Scientology is drawn.”

The Sea Org has no members. But Deixler told a California court that the senior leadership of Scientology is drawn “exclusively” from the Sea Org – a group that Mr. Jefferson told a Texas court can have no directors, officers, managing agents, executives, employees, staff members, or volunteers.

So, let’s review the scorecard…

— In order to keep David Miscavige out of a deposition in a Texas lawsuit, Scientology claims that the Sea Org does not exist and has no members. Sea Org members derive authority only from their posts in the Church of Scientology hierarchy.

— In order to threaten Dan Koon, Gary Soter asserts that the Sea Org and its contracts exist, that they are legally binding; and that they can serve as the basis of a lawsuit to collect $5,000,000 in liquidated damages.

— In order to claim First Amendment protection for its abusive treatment of employees, Bert Deixler said in Laura DeCrescenzo’s lawsuit that all of Scientology’s senior executives are drawn from its monastic order the Sea Org.

Deixler was unsparing on this point in defending the Sea Org’s policies, which include outrageous treatment of children, as Laura DeCrescenzo was. Deixler cited Higgins v. Maher (1989), a case which states that anyone who enters into employment as religious clergy forfeits the protection of the civil authorities:

The courts of this State have recognized that the ministerial exception bars judicial interference with discipline or administration by churches of their clergy…”In our society, jealous as it is of separation of church and state, one who enters the clergy forfeits the protection of the civil authorities in terms of job rights.”

As I wrote in a previous column, this “ministerial exception” is why Sea Org workers do not have to be paid minimum wage or overtime; why they can be locked up and brutalized in the Rehabilitation Project Force; and why they receive no pension after decades of service. Scientology has been able to subject its workforce to endless hours, sleep deprivation, unhealthful food and psychological terrorizing, and American courts have been reluctant to do anything about it.

The Church sees Sea Org members as “coins” that can be traded among Orgs and then kicked to the curb when they weaken from age or infirmity. The Sea Org euphemism for this cruelty is called “Fitness Boarding.” Old and sick Sea Org members are fitness boarded, given $500, and then shown the door.

Is what I am describing inaccurate? Is my language too strong? Not according to the words of Bert Deixler and the Church of Scientology in their filings opposing Laura DeCrescenzo’s lawsuit:

Even if an ecclesiastical decision appears harsh, humiliating, unfair, or irrational from a secular viewpoint, civil courts have no role to play…

The Church of Scientology’s justification for its humiliating and sadistic treatment of Sea Org workers is the First Amendment. However, when Captain David Miscavige of the Sea Org is at risk of being deposed, the Sea Org does not exist.

The Church of Scientology should not be able to have it both ways: A legally nonexistent entity cannot have First Amendment protections.

The late Earle Cooley, an attorney for the Church of Scientology, once caught someone the Church was suing in a contradiction during a deposition. Cooley calmly asked, “So which story are you sticking with?”

Thus, we turn Mr. Cooley’s question to David Miscavige and the Church of Scientology: Does the Sea Org exist or does it not exist?

Which story are you sticking with, Mr. Miscavige?